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Keep a promise to vacationland

We’re taking the temporary 40 degree temperature drop as a reminder to all of us that we can’t let this summer evaporate!

Last week and 80 degrees was wonderful, if a bit seasonally premature. And we’re not to the solstice yet, but soon we’ll be counting down the days again. And it’s time to nail down those plans to get to Spruce Point Inn for that scene-changing, soul-refreshing getaway (or dinner with summer guests) that’s been waiting all winter.

Everything goes by so fast and the demands of our 24/7 culture are so insistent that it becomes easier to choose the path of less-resistance, to just run with the pace of the moment for fear of falling behind. Dinner conversation with a friend from England recently turned to Americans and their vacations. She just could not understand why Americans don’t use their vacation time when we make such a purposeful study of virtually everything else (or like to think we do.) She said, “We get 5 weeks and no one thanks you for not taking them.” Besides, every expert tells us vacations are good for us, clinically proven to prevent burnout, early aging and stress-related disease.

But we’re not selling vitamins here! A summer visit to Boothbay is not a punishment or obligation. It’s inspiring, intoxicating (in the sparkling ocean sense) and it’s relaxing. At Spruce Point Inn we watch guests unwind, unwrap themselves from the smart-phone hunch, and stretch out with a vantage point of the lighthouse and Linekin Bay. The hum in 88 and Bogie’s each evening soon reaches that delightful mix of laughter, clinked silverware and glasses, ambered in the light of summer sunsets, burnished with the warm conviviality of happy people (and happy hosts).

Instead of the path of least resistance, we point guests towards woodland paths the Abenaki roamed, to waterfront footprints and tidal pools, through garden paths and easy-going hiking trails along shore and salt-marsh (welcoming four-, as well as two-footed travelers). Instead of breadcrumbs we leave out locally fished, farmed, gathered, brewed and corked delights to entice visitors deep into all the sensory morsels this corner of Vacationland can serve up.

Instead of urgency, Spruce Point is a deep breath of sea air, sun-warmed spruce and “what can we do for you?” It’s a path to promises.

Keep one here, collecting “oceanside memories made in Maine.”